Info

222 Paranormal Podcast

All things paranormal With your host Jennifer Shortridge & Joe Shortridge Brother and Sister duo Joe and Jen have been interested in all things paranormal since their childhood. We bring to you our personal experiences, news from the paranormal world and special guests.
RSS Feed
222 Paranormal Podcast
2024
June
May
April
March
February
January


2023
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2022
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2021
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: May, 2024
May 26, 2024

Please hit Subscribe and leave a positive comment.

Click here to go to Our website.

Click here to go to our Patreon Page.

Click here for the Ohio State reformatory.

Click her to save on clothing and home goods.

Today we visit with our good friend and podbuddy Matt Slys. Matt shares some interesting story’s and encounters.

Matt Slys is a DJ for WOBL/WDLW-Host of The Magical Mystery Hour. Also an Investigator with 111 Paranormal.

Today’s Ohio State Reformatory

The Mansfield Reformatory Preservation Society is a non-profit overseen by a volunteer Board and every donation goes directly to the maintenance and restoration of the building.

The Reformatory houses the official Ohio State Corrections History Museum, is a popular site for ghost hunters and paranormal enthusiasts, hosts numerous special events, and as of 2018 welcomes more than 120,000 visitors per year.

The building’s striking architecture is a favorite choice for filmmakers. A number of films and music videos have been made at OSR over the years, with The Shawshank Redemption as the best known and most widely loved. Other films include: Harry and Walter Go to New York, Tango and Cash, Air Force One, Escape Plan: The Extractors and Judas and the Black Messiah.

 

Design and Construction

The Ohio State Reformatory was designed by Cleveland architect Levi Scofield. Scofield designed the striking limestone building to be an uplifting, inspiring, and intimidating structure. The Reformatory was originally called the “Intermediate Penitentiary” since it accepted inmates who were too old for juvenile corrections but had committed offenses more minor than those that sent others to the Ohio State Penitentiary. The facility admitted its first inmates in 1896 after ten years of construction.

 

Reformation and Rehabilitation

The goal of the institution was truly to “reform” and rehabilitate its inmates, who received three things during their time at OSR: religion, education, and a trade. Inmates were admitted for 18 months, and if they showed progress, they could be released after that time. If not, they received another 18 months.  The model was successful and OSR had a high success rate and a low recidivism rate.

May 19, 2024

 

Please hit subscribe and leave a positive comment.

Click here to go to our Patreon Page.

Click here to go to our website.

Click here to save on clothing and home goods.

Click here to see Joe’s book.

 

Since the beginning of recorded time, man has claimed to be able to communicate with the spirit world. However, it would not be until the heyday of the Spiritualist movement that he would begin claiming to do so as an everyday occurrence. That particular movement was founded by two young girls, Kate and Maggie Fox, who established a way to communicate with a ghost. They used a series of knocks and raps that answered “yes” and “no” and eventually assigned a code for letters of the alphabet. In this way, they were able to spell out longer and more detailed messages.

 

As Spiritualism grew in popularity, those with an interest began to establish what were called “home circles”, small groups of friends and family members who would gather around and attempt to communicate with spirits. They experimented with the knocking and rapping sounds and later with Table Tilting, which was accessible to everyone and no professional mediums were needed. The knockings and rappings of the early movement continued to spread in other directions as ordinary people began experimenting with their own skills as mediums. Soon, the tiresome and time-consuming method of knocking and tipping tables began to fall out of fashion and so mediums began a new form of contact called “automatic writing”. While practiced almost solely by spirit mediums, it still became very popular at séances as a direct line to the spirit world.

 

The open circle

When Vince, now 30, was a child, one of his friends goaded him into playing with a Ouija board in his basement. Young Vince didn’t expect anything out of the ordinary to happen, so he went along with it. Once they started to play, however, the lights began to flicker, the air around them grew cold, and a spirit began to communicate with them through the board. The spirit spelled out a Russian name and claimed he had been murdered.

 

“We took a break to make some pizza rolls,” Vince says, “but we forgot to close the circle when we were done.” (If you’re new to Ouija board stories, that’s a giant no-no!) “After returning to the basement, the energy was much heavier, and books and things were sprawled out on the floor.” And yet, the board remained perfectly still in the center of the room, just how they had left it. “Upon looking at a mirror that we had nearby, the eye of the Ouija board was moving sporadically in its reflection.”

 

Solo play

Most people play with a Ouija board in groups, or at least with one other person. But Ossiana wanted to try to use it on her own. She put her hands on the pointer and asked questions, but nothing happened. She took her hands off of the pointer and was about to put the game away when the planchette began to move around on its own. “I’ll never try that again,” says the 30-year-old from New Jersey.

In 1933, Dorothea Turley and her 15 year-old daughter, Mattie, were convicted of the murder their husband and father. On the witness stand, Mattie stated how the Ouija board, which had been directed by her mother, had told her that it was all right to kill her father so that her mother could marry "cowboy". Mattie later killed him with a shotgun. The jury determined that the crime had more to do with insurance money and Dorothea's lover than a Ouija board and Dorothea went to prison and Mattie for reform school, where she stayed until she was 21. Her mother was released on an appeal three years after the original trial.

 

May 12, 2024

PLEASE HIT SUBSCRIBE AND LEAVE A POSITIVE COMMENT

Click here for our Patreon Page.

Click here to save on clothing and home goods.

Click here to go to Joe’s woodworking page.

Click here to go to our website.

If you enjoy the show become a Patreon member. There you will have extra content plus a lot more.

What are wormholes?

The wormhole theory postulates that a theoretical passage through space-time could create shortcuts for long journeys across the universe.

Wormholes are predicted by the theory of general relativity.

But be wary: wormholes bring with them the dangers of sudden collapse, high radiation and dangerous contact with exotic matter.

We asked physicist Robert Kehoe, some frequently asked questions about wormholes.

Robert Kehoe

Professor, Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University

Robert Kehoe is a physicist currently studying the nature of the accelerating expansion of the universe. He is a lead researcher on the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESO), which is creating a far-reaching map of our universe. His research has also included work in particle physics, including contributing to the discovery of the Higgs boson, a previously only theoretical subatomic particle that allows for things to have mass.

Are wormholes theoretically possible?

A wormhole is thought to be essentially a tunnel from one place in space to another. When you have a massive object in spacetime, it basically creates a curvature of the spacetime in the nearby region.

As you get more and more mass, we expect that that curvature becomes more and more extreme. We think such objects occur in the universe, and they are what we call a black hole, where light cannot escape due to this extreme curvature of spacetime.

We think what happens is, at some point, if the mass of an object becomes large enough, the other forces of nature besides gravity can’t support the matter, and it becomes a black hole. You could think about this as one side of a wormhole.

Could you have a situation in which the curvature is extreme enough to connect up with something analogous on the other side somewhere else in spacetime? Theoretically, that could be true.

Has a wormhole ever been found?

No. We have a substantial amount of evidence for the existence of black holes.  But there's been no wormholes found.  

Are there different types of wormholes?

 There are different theoretical implementations of our theory of gravitation, called general relativity, that would describe wormholes with somewhat different properties. For instance, one of the big distinctions in the types of wormholes that are described are whether or not they are traversable — by that I mean, whether you can go from one end to another.

 

When was the wormhole theory created?

Wormholes were first theorized in 1916, though that wasn't what they were called at the time. While reviewing another physicist's solution to the equations in Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity, Austrian physicist Ludwig Flamm realized another solution was possible. He described a "white hole," a theoretical time reversal of a black hole. Entrances to both black and white holes could be connected by a space-time conduit.

In 1935, Einstein and physicist Nathan Rosen used the theory of general relativity to elaborate on the idea, proposing the existence of "bridges" through space-time. These bridges connect two different points in space-time, theoretically creating a shortcut that could reduce travel time and distance. The shortcuts came to be called Einstein-Rosen bridges, or wormholes.

"The whole thing is very hypothetical at this point," said Stephen Hsu, a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Oregon, told our sister site, LiveScience. "No one thinks we're going to find a wormhole anytime soon."

Wormholes contain two mouths, with a throat connecting the two, according to an article published in the Journal of High Energy Physics (2020). The mouths would most likely be spheroidal. The throat might be a straight stretch, but it could also wind around, taking a longer path than a more conventional route might require.

Einstein's theory of general relativity mathematically predicts the existence of wormholes, but none have been discovered to date. A negative mass wormhole might be spotted by the way its gravity affects light that passes by.

Certain solutions of general relativity allow for the existence of wormholes where the mouth of each is a black hole. However, a naturally occurring black hole, formed by the collapse of a dying star, does not by itself create a wormhole.

 

May 5, 2024

 

Please Hit that Subscribe Button, and leave a positive comment.

 

Click here to go to our Patreon Page.

Click here to save on clothing.

Click here to go to our website.

Click here to go to Joes Woodworking page.

 

In German folklore and ghostlore, a poltergeist 'rumbling ghost' or 'noisy spirit') is a type of ghost or spirit that is responsible for physical disturbances, such as loud noises and objects being moved or destroyed. Most claims or fictional descriptions of poltergeists show them as being capable of pinching, biting, hitting, and tripping people. They are also depicted as capable of the movement or levitation of objects such as furniture and cutlery, or noises such as knocking on doors. Foul smells are also associated with poltergeist occurrences, as well as spontaneous fires and different electrical issues such as flickering lights.

 

These manifestations have been recorded in many cultures and countries, including Brazil, Australia, the United States, Japan and most European nations. The first recorded cases date back to the 1st century.

 

The Enfield poltergeist was a claim of supernatural activity at 284 Green Street, a council house in Brimsdown, Enfield, London, England, between 1977 and 1979. The alleged poltergeist activity centred on sisters Janet, aged 11, and Margaret Hodgson, aged 13.

Some members of the Society for Psychical Research (SPR), such as inventor Maurice Grosse and writer Guy Lyon Playfair, believed the haunting to be genuine, while others such as Anita Gregory and John Beloff were "unconvinced" and found evidence the girls had faked incidents for the benefit of journalists. Members of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal (CSICOP), including stage magicians such as Milbourne Christopher and Joe Nickell, criticized paranormal investigators for being credulous whilst also identifying elements of the case as being indicative of a hoax.

The story attracted press coverage in British newspapers, has been mentioned in books, featured in television and radio documentaries, and dramatised in the 2016 horror film The Conjuring 2.

Claims

In August 1977, single parent Peggy Hodgson called the Metropolitan Police to her rented home at 284 Green Street in Enfield, London, saying she had witnessed furniture moving and that two of her four children had heard knocking sounds on the walls. The children included Janet, aged 11, and Margaret, aged 13. A police constable reported witnessing a chair "wobble and slide" but "could not determine the cause of the movement."[3] Later claims included disembodied voices, loud noises, thrown toys, overturned chairs, and children levitating.

Over a period of eighteen months, more than thirty people, including the Hodgsons' neighbours, paranormal investigators and journalists, said they variously saw heavy furniture moving of its own accord, objects being thrown across a room and the sisters seeming to levitate several feet off the ground. Many also heard and recorded knocking noises and a gruff voice. The story was regularly covered in the Daily Mirror newspaper until reports came to an end in 1979.

 

#paranormal #Shortridge #ghost #podcast #money #holloween #ghosthunting #sasquatch #haunted #medeumship

1